The U.S. Public Smarter (But Lazier) Than It Looks

A BBC audio podcast from the show “Four Thought” (go here and click on the date “13 8 14”) includes a talk by Italian journalist Mara Oliva. She grew up in the same Italy infatuated with the U.S. that I lived in as an exchange student — an Italy that has largely fallen out of love with the greatest purveyor of violence in the world.

Oliva makes a case that the U.S. public is not nearly as pro-war as its government.

As early as 1954 the U.S. public opposed a U.S. war in Vietnam, and favored diplomacy with China, according to polls commissioned by President Eisenhower.  Nixon finally went to China decades after the public had begun favoring that move.

In January 2003, two-thirds of the U.S. public wanted U.N. inspections to be allowed to continue in Iraq. In February 2003, a majority still wanted to see more evidence and wanted U.N. inspections to continue.

In September 2013, 80% in the U.S. were against attacking Syria. (Let’s hope that holds now that Obomber wants to attack the other side in that war.)

So, it remains possible to be fond of the United States if one looks away from what we allow our government to do and focuses instead on what we tell pollsters we’d like.

But our expressing good opinions and then sitting on our hands is perhaps not the height of good world citizenship.